Map.

Pre 1860

Events

Date:

Subject:
Language and topography

Source:
Social History of Byker, Muir, 1970


One theory about the origins of ‘Byker’ derives from the Norwegian or Norse word ‘kerr’ or ‘carr’ which is translated to marsh, so that the area was a place by the marsh.  The eastern part of Heaton was and is known as a former marshy place. Likewise, the land at the bottom of Byker Hill, south of Gordon Rd to St. Lawrence is formed mainly by alluvial clay from the glacier that shaped the Tyne gorge.

Byker Hill is located on Upper Carboniferous rock, containing sandstone, coal seams, shale and clay.

Date:
122

Subject:
Place

Source:
The Great Walls of Newcastle, Ordnance survey maps and P. Thirkell


Possibly the earliest form of the visible evidence of development in Byker was by Roman Emperor, Hadrian.  A wall, turrets and mile castles, stretching from the east and west coasts provided a barrier to invading border clans and tribes.  Hadrian’s wall lies just south of Shields Rd and was excavated in the 1990’s.  The area was populated by soldiers and their suppliers of foods, livestock and trades, such as weavers, saddlers and blacksmiths amongst others.  There are the remains of a mile castle or small fort near Brough Park dog track.

Date:
1066

Subject:
People

Source:
Ordnance survey maps and P. Thirkell


The Norman claim to the throne of England results in the battle of Hastings in which Harold the English king was killed by William of Normandy.

Date:
1080

Subject:
Place

Source:


A new castle and surrounding wall were built by the Normans to provide a fortified base for the king.  William’s eldest son was installed to defend the northern border.

Date:
1198

Subject:
People

Source:
M.H. Dodds, a History of Northumberland, Vol. 30, 1930, p.265-6, from the Book of Fees.


Byker first appears in historical documents ‘as the most important Serjeantry in Northumberland’ held by William of Byker, named William Escolland, who was a Norman noble.

Date:
1340

Subject:
Place and people

Source:
Welford, History of Northumberland and Gateshead. Vol. 2, p.107


According to records, a John Byker held the land, ‘containing a caracute of land (as much land as be tilled in a year by a plough) and a hundred acres of wood’.  A yearly payment was made to the king via the castle at Newcastle.

 

Over the next few centuries the land at Byker was transferred, sold and inherited on numerous occasions between Northumberland landowners. At one time it was owned by the Percy’s, the Earls of Northumberland, based at Alnwick.

Date:
1543

Subject:
Place and people

Source:
Welford, History of Northumberland and Gateshead. Vol. 2, p.222, 264-5


Parliamentary records describe much of the land in the area being sold to a James Lawson, whose heirs owned it until the 1840’s. In 1549 the Mayor and Burgesses of Newcastle sought to extend the towns boundaries to include part of Byker Township, to take advantage of the land by the river ‘for the dropping of ballast for the coal trade’.  The transaction was disputed due to financial disagreements and eventually settled in the House of Commons and the House of Lords in London.

Date:
1600 - 1800

Subject:
Place

Source:
Muir


Sir Robert Mansell opens the first glassworks on Tyneside at St. Lawrence. To help distribution, a stone bridge is built over the Ouseburn in 1669 named Glasshouse Bridge.  Lime kilns open on Ballast hills in 1663 and flint mills are built in the lower Ouseburn valley.  Ship building begins in St. Peter’s.  Hugenot (mainly Dutch Protestant) refugees settle in St Peters which becomes known as the ‘Velvet City’.

Date:
1801

Subject:
People and place

Source:
National Census. Oliver’s Map of Newcastle and Ordnance Survey, 1855 and 1882 and E. Mackensie, The Historical Topographical and Descriptive History of the County of Northumberland, 1825, p186


he population of the Byker township was recorded at 3,254.

The previous century saw the rise of one of Tyneside’s early industrial areas in the lower Ouseburn valley.

By 1808, Rowe’s yard at St. Peter’s was at the time, the largest shipbuilders on Tynesde.

According to Mackensie, in 1825 the population exceeded four thousand.

Oliver’s map of 1844 shows the land at Byker as rural and agricultural, made up of  fields and ‘closes’ owned by a small number of landowners, including the Ridleys.  A small number of coal ‘bell’ and clay pits are shown as well as Lawson’s Main pit on the Fossway, an old Roman street.  There are sandstone quarries nearby.  By 1825 the coal pits in Byker had been closed.

Date:
1835

Subject:
Place and people

Source:
Dodds, p.270 and Mackensie, p.480


The middle and latter part of the century saw the expansion of the coal trade To service this growth, quarries, brick, lead and glassworks, flax mills, a tannery, wind powered flour-mills and coal based engineering businesses were established employing increasing numbers of people.  Shipbuilding and potteries opened in the St. Peters and St Lawrence areas: Hawthorn Leslie and Maling are just two examples.

Date:
1839

Subject:
Transport

Source:
Bygone Byker, S. Harrison and D. Yardley, 1990, N’cle Libraries and P.Thirkell


Opening of the Newcastle to North Shields rail bridge over the Ouseburn, replacing a timber laminated bridge. It was later widened to increase rail traffic.

Date:
1840’s

Subject:
People and place

Source:
M.Sill, Newcastle’s Changing Map, Edited by Burke and Buswell, 1992


Failure of the potato crop in Ireland.  Newcastle’s population experienced large numbers of Gaelic speaking Irish migrants. In1841 they were 5.73% of the total population. In ten years the Irish were 8.02% of the total. They were joined by Scots and other migrants looking for work in the new industries.

Date:
1840’s

Subject:
Place

Source:
Mackensie, p. 480


Sir John Lawson, the heir of James some three hundred years before, sold much of the land to a Mr. Rowe of St. Peters.  Following the failure of Rowe’s business, the land north of the turnpike road (Shields Rd) was sold to the wealthy Ridley family of Northumberland, whilst the land south was sold to a Matthew Plummer and then to a Collingwood of Dissington.  It’s recorded that some of the land in Byker was owned by the Dent family who owned a nearby fishery in the Tyne and a colliery at St. Anthony’s.

Date:
1851

Subject:
People

Source:


Population of Byker 7,040

Date:
1853

Subject:
People

Source:
Snowdon, N’cle’s Changing Map


Cholera epidemic in Newcastle. 1,500 people out of a total of 90,000 died in just five weeks. Typhus, scarlet fever, diarrhoea, diphtheria, whooping couch, measles and small pox killed many more. Overcrowding, the accumulation of rubbish, a lack of sanitation (drainage, water and toilets) was common.

Date:
1859

Subject:
Place, people

Source:
Muir


Robert Maling relocates his pottery from Sunderland to Ford St, Byker.

1860's

Events

Date:
1860

Subject:
Place

Source:
Kirby, Newcastle’s Changing Map


The Tyne becomes the second busiest river, exceeded only by London in terms of river traffic

Date:
1862

Subject:
Place

Source:


Consecration of St. Michaels Church, Church of England.

Date:
1872-1910's

Subject:
Place

Source:
Muir, p.12, Welford as above and Taylor in N’cle’s Changing Map


With the increasing industry in the area, Collingwood divided much of Byker into separate building plots and sold the land to property developers to house working people.  The housing was laid out on a grid pattern, very common at the time: rows of terraced ‘Tyneside’ flats to maximise space, with the door on the pavement and an access lane and yard to the back.  Most of the housing was for artisans and people engaged in manufacturing: as dressmakers, engineers, factory workers, grocers or housemaids.

Municipal facilities such as the police and fire station, schools, bathhouse, washhouse and pool were built as well as a reservoir and sewerage system.  Corner shops and public houses were created, generating employment for a working population. Shops and commercial activity were located chiefly on Brinkburn St, Raby St and mainly on Shields Rd with factories and industrial areas in the Ouseburn, on the Quayside and the Fossway and the western end of Shields Rd, Wallsend and Walker.

 

Date:
1855 and 1911

Subject:
Place

Source:
O.S. maps


From the 1860’s to early 1910’s many more homes were built to meet the increasing demand for a working population to service industry.

1870's

Events

Date:
1874-5

Subject:
People

Source:
Muir


The Victoria Jubilee school opens followed a year later by Byker Library on Brinkburn St.

Date:
1878

Subject:
Transport

Source:
Harrsion and Wardley, Newcastle Libraries


Opening of Byker Bridge, a toll bridge, costing £50,000.  It avoided the steep Byker Bank and smaller bridges over the Ouseburn.

Date:
1879

Subject:
Transport

Source:
Harrsion and Wardley, Newcastle Libraries


Opening of the Riverside branch railway between Byker and Wallsend via St. Peters and Walker.  In 1878 Maling opened a second pottery Ford B, now known as Hoult’s Yard.  It was possibly the largest pottery in Britain at the time.

1880's

Events

Date:
1881

Subject:
People

Source:
Buswell, N’cle’s Changing Map


31% of Byker’s children under one year old die.

Date:
1885

Subject:
Place

Source:
O.S.


A.D. Charlton in ‘Newcastle Town’ writes: “From the top of Byker Bank to Byker Hill, we have one of the most remarkable illustrations of recent growth in the area. A few years ago Shields Rd ran between open fields; now it runs though the middle of a new town.”

 

The O.S. map of this year shows Shields Rd or The Turnpike, a toll road, a ropery near St. Lawrence and properties at Byker Village, Byker Hall, Byker Cottage, Quality Row, Byker Buildings, The Blue Bell pub and The Hope and Anchor Inn.

Date:
1886

Subject:
Place

Source:


St. Lawrence (Church of England) opens on Walker Rd.

1890's

Events

Date:
1893

Subject:
Place

Source:
J. Steele


Opening of the Ouseburn School, by architect Frank Rich. His practice also built Turnbull’s warehouse in Newcastle amongst others. Both are designed in an oriental, gothic style, the height of fashion in its day!

Date:
1895

Subject:
Transport

Source:
N’cle libraries


The toll charge on Byker Bridge is removed and the bridge is bought by the city corporation

Date:
1897

Subject:
Place

Source:
N’cle libraries


Byker Presbyterian Church is consecrated, later to become the United Reformed Church, then Kingsland Church and more recently as studios for artists – (though you wouldn’t know it!)

Date:
1890’s – 1910’s

Subject:
Place

Source:
Newcastle City Council


The lower Ouseburn valley is established by Newcastle council as a suitable place for the dumping of the city’s waste.  Unsurprisingly it becomes known as ‘Byker tip’.

Date:
1895

Subject:
Place

Source:
Hayler Newspaper, 1903, Vol.3, p.84


Opening of the East End Police Station, designed by Cackett, Burns and Dick, similar to the Ouseburn school.

Date:
1896

Subject:
Place

Source:
N’cle Libraries & Muir


Opening of The Grand Theatre at the foot of Shields Rd, a popular theatre and music hall.

Opening of a communal laundry, bathhouses and swimming pool at Shipley Baths.

Date:
1897

Subject:
Place

Source:
N’ce Libraries, Byker Phoenix and J. Keith


St. Lawrence R.C. Church opens by the Dominican Friary as a re-used church.  It was originally built as a Presbyterian Church on New Bridge St. in 1847, designed by John Dobson.

Raby St. School opens. (Most of the school was demolished in the mid-‘70’s and rebuilt to create a new school.  Ward councillors suggested naming it after the Newcastle East MP, Edward Short.  Some Byker people campaigned to make sure this didn’t happen: it became Byker Primary School).

1900's

Events

Date:
1901

Subject:
People and place

Source:
N’cle Libraries


Byker’s population peaks at 45,460

Raby St. is one of the first streets in Newcastle with electric trams.

Date:
1903

Subject:
Place

Source:
N’cle Libraries


Byker Bridge is widened to ease traffic congestion.

Date:
1907

Subject:
Place

Source:
N’cle Libraries


Part of the lower Ouseburn is culverted to provide a greater surface area for the city’s rubbish.

1910's

Events

Date:
1911

Subject:
People

Source:
Middlebrook, 1968


Population 48,709

Date:
1914

Subject:
People

Source:
Wikipedia and others


Birth of Ralph Erskine, (architect of the Byker redevelopment) born in either Monilaws, a village in Northumberland or London depending on what you read.

 

The Sun Ray Clinic on Brinkburn St. is built.

Date:
1917

Subject:
People

Source:
Muir


Byker Township was split in to three separate districts to form the Wards of Byker, St. Anthony’s and St. Lawrence.

Date:
1914- 1918

Subject:
People, place

Source:


First world war in which tens of thousands of people from Tyneside fought. Many died, as did millions of others.

Date:
1918 – 1920’s

Subject:
People, place

Source:


A ‘homes for heroes’ house building programme is launched by central government to provide quality council homes for people on low and medium incomes.  One example is the houses on Walker Rd. by St. Lawrence Park.

1920's

Events

Date:
1921

Subject:
People, place

Source:
National census


Byker’s population is 17,507.

Date:
1920- 1930’s

Subject:

Source:
N’cle Libraries, Muir B., Ness and V. Tollitt


Opening of Byker Library, Brinkburn St. and St. Michael’s Church Hall on Headlam St. later to become Byker Community Centre.

College Sweet factory opens on Ballast Hill.

A first world war memorial is dedicated and installed in Raby Street School as a memorial of former pupils who had died in the first world war.  After many years in storage it was rededicated and installed in Byker Community Centre in 2012.

Albion Buildings a block of tenements are built on Albion Row.

Parrish’s Department store opens attracting people from Newcastle and North Tyneside and Rington’s Tea factory opens.

1930's

Events

Date:
1929-30’s

Subject:
People

Source:
Snowden, N’cle’s Changing Map


An economic recession occurs resulting in unemployment and the Jarrow March to London.  In 1933 there are 30,000 unemployed men in Newcastle.

Date:
1935

Subject:
Place

Source:
Newcastle City Council


Many Georgian era dwellings are demolished in many parts of the Ouseburn and Albion Row to improve housing conditions, sanitation and health.

1940's

Events

Date:
1939 -1945

Subject:
Place, people

Source:


The second world war. Widespread bombing occurs with severe damage to St. Lawrence and St. Peter’s industrial areas.

Bomb shelters were located in back lanes and back yards for people to share.  A bomb shelter still remains in the yard of the former Sun Ray Clinic on the corner of Brinkburn St and Commercial Rd, probably used by medical staff and patients, Byker library staff and members, and people using St. Michaels Mission Hall, next door.

The Victoria Tunnel by the Ouseburn was also used as a bomb shelter.  The Sun Ray Clinic now houses a food importing business whilst the mission hall is a metal fabrication business.  The former library on Brinkburn St. is used as a council storage depot.

A factory for making Newcastle’s school dinners is built on St. Michael’s Rd, surrounded by allotments. The factory is now rehearsal and recording studios for musicians.

Date:
1945-1960’s

Subject:
People

Source:
Snowdon, N’cle’s Changing Map


Major improvements are made to public health in sanitation and pollution. The National Health Service is created as part of the welfare state, providing doctors surgeries, hospitals and clinics.  Council house building continues.

A factory for making Newcastle’s school dinners is built on St. Michael’s Rd, surrounded by allotments. The factory is now rehearsal and recording venue for musicians.

St. Lawrence and St. Peter’s is redeveloped with notable companies like shipbuilders Hawthorn Leslie and Spillers flour mill.

Domestos a chemical company establishes premises on Ballast Hill on a former sweet factory, College Sweets.

1950's

Events

Date:
1951

Subject:
People

Source:
National census


The population in Byker falls to 14,215

Date:
1950’s to mid-‘60’s

Subject:
Place and people

Source:
Buswell, N’cle’s Changing Map


Population decline due to a transition of people moving to more ‘modern’ housing in Walker, Heaton, Benton, Longbenton, Cowgate, Blakelaw, North Kenton and Killingworth – a Byker diaspora is created.

1960's

Events

Date:
1961

Subject:
People

Source:


Byker’s population stands at 11,645

Date:
1960- 1965

Subject:
People

Source:
C. Foote Wood, 2010


T. Dan Smith is elected Leader of Newcastle City Council.  Smith is credited in leading the campaign to clean up the polluted river Tyne, in shaping the modern city by massive transport and motorway works, helping to establish Newcastle Airport and Northern Arts, forging a strong regional identity that developed close links with Scandinavian countries, attracting I.B.M. (at the time the leading manufacturer of computer technology) to Peterlee, Co. Durham and later attracting Nissan to Sunderland.  Newcastle was the first council to appoint a Chief Executive.

 

T. Dan Smith later reflected that his greatest achievement was the realisation of the Byker redevelopment: decent quality homes based upon participation and democratic engagement.

Date:
1963

Subject:
Place

Source:


Maling pottery (owned by Hoults) closes.

Date:
1964

Subject:
People

Source:


Harold Wilson elected as Prime Minister of a Labour government. The time ushered in a sense of ambition, technological advances, widespread motorised transport and major changes to urban areas, in education, housing and health.

Date:
1966

Subject:
People

Source:
Newcastle City Council


Wilfred Burns, Chief Planning Officer within NCC produces ‘Byker Neighbourhood’ a blue print for the demolition of homes to provide space for high quality housing bounded by a motorway to the north and north east.

Population of Byker, 13,420.

 

Land south of Shields Rd is cleared for the planned motorway involving the demolition of 4,000 homes. Shipley Baths (now Climb Newcastle and a private gym club), The Glendale pub (now Gorman’s Fish Shop) and The Plough pub (Albaik restaurant) are kept from demolition.

 

The lower Ouseburn valley is populated by many metal recycling businesses or scrap yards, car dismantlers, rag traders and other recyclers.

Date:
1968

Subject:
People and place

Source:
Newcastle City Council


12% of the population were elderly compared to the city average of 9%

 

Ralph Erskine is appointed to redesign the Byker area by Conservative politicians on the strength of his work in Sweden, Canada, Cambridge and Killingworth. Erskine writes a ‘Plan of Intent’ as an approach to design the neighbourhood involving residents in phased redevelopment of the area.  Phased clearance begins.

Date:
1969

Subject:
Place, people

Source:
Newcastle City Council


Ralph Erskine opens an office in Hindmarsh’s funeral parlour at 45, Brinkburn St.  The flat above the shop is lived in by a number of the architects.  The shop has an ‘open door policy’ allowing residents to visit, discuss plans and future tenancy allocations.

1970's

Events

Date:
1970

Subject:
Place, people

Source:
Muir


Out of 6,000 Victorian-era dwellings, only 50% had hot water and an internal bath. Most are still equipped with outside toilets or ‘netties’.

Byker has the highest density of people in the city.

The Newcastle and Gateshead Water Company opens a central office, workshops and depot on the former reservoir at the top of Byker Hill.

Date:
1970

Subject:

Source:
Newcastle City Council


‘Byker Reappraisal’ written by Erskine in partnership with NCC.

Date:
Early 1970’s

Subject:
Place

Source:
NCC and M. Drage


Major infrastructure works begin in the lower Ouseburn valley involving land clearance, road works and improvements to the roof of the culvert.  Hills are seeded with grass and thousands of trees are planted.

City Farm, Byker and Stepney Bank Stables are established providing educational and leisure activities for local people and visitors.

Janet Square or the pilot scheme is completed involving residents in design aspects, valuable in making changes to later Erskine housing.

The Odean cinema (formerly Black’s Regal theatre), closes.

Date:
1973

Subject:
People, place

Source:
Newcastle City Council


Phase 1 of the Perimeter Block is completed, from Dalton Crescent to Shipley Rise.

First occurrence of the phrase, ‘Byker Wall’.

Date:
1974

Subject:
People

Source:
Evening Chronicle


In a Council meeting Erskine suggests that the future of the Byker redevelopment might rest in a process of resident co-management of the area.

Date:
Mid 1970’s

Subject:
People

Source:
Evening Chronicle


A local Pastor, Frank Wappatt leads a campaign to stop the redevelopment from happening.

Date:
1974

Subject:

Source:
P. Nunn, Evening Chronicle and City News


Phase 2 of the Byker Wall is completed from Rabygate to Byker Crescent.

According to the Evening Chronicle, the metal roofs for the first phase were to be dark blue, the second phase bright green and third might alternate between blue and green. “Anyone flying overhead is likely to have a psychedelic freak-out”.

The Byker redevelopment is formally opened by the Duke of Edinburgh, the Lady Mayor and other dignitaries.

A delegation of civic leaders from Newcastle’s twin-town, Gelsenkirchen in Germany visits the Byker redevelopment.

Clifford St. Police Station opens as does The Masonic Lodge also on Clifford St.

Date:
1975

Subject:
Place

Source:
Observer Magazine, 15th June 1975


The Observer newspaper features the new Byker on its magazine front cover and in a three page article.

Date:
1975

Subject:
People

Source:
City survey and Byker residents


Population in the east city area declines by 35%.

The launch of BYKER PHOENIX, a community newspaper.

Date:
1976

Subject:
People

Source:
Byker Phoenix and others


The first Byker Festival organised by residents.

Date:
1977

Subject:
Place

Source:
Byker School Booklet, May 1978, N’cle Libraries.


Byker Primary School opens.  The Headteacher at the time wrote in a report: “The spirit of kindness and cheerfulness pervades the whole school, discipline is well-maintained and the training, physical, mental and moral, is excellent.”

Date:
1978

Subject:
Place

Source:


Opening of Tom Collings House named after the St. Lawrence Councillor and former Head of Housing

Date:
1979

Subject:
Place

Source:


Opening of Allendale Community Centre.

Date:
1979

Subject:
People

Source:


Byker Combined Heat and Power Station opens to convert the city’s waste into pellets to sell to industry and burn to supply a district heating system for Byker.

Ralph Erskine awarded a CBE – Commander of the Order of the British Empire. The Byker redevelopment receives many accolades including a Civic Trust award.

Margaret Thatcher, Conservative, is elected as Prime Minister.

1980's

Events

Date:
1981

Subject:
People

Source:
National census NCC, Evening Chronicle and The Journal


Population, 8,800

The first phase of a New Enterprise Workshop opens later to become Byker Business Development creating premises for small businesses.

The Apolla Cinema closes.  The Hope and Anchor Inn is altered and renamed Jackson’s.  The Raby Bingo is burnt down by arsonists.

Spanning the Ouseburn Valley, Byker Viaduct is built for the Metro train network, designed by Ove Arup, originally a local engineering company.

Date:
1983

Subject:
People

Source:
Evening Chronicle


Sirkka-Lisa Kontinnen produces ‘Byker’ a collection of photographs and stories about Byker before redevelopment.  It is followed by a film of the same title and is shown on television by Channel 4.

 

Bruvvers Theatre buys the former flax mill in the Ouseburn valley as a venue for theatre, the arts, artists and craft studios.  It acts as a catalyst for the later gentrification of the lower Ouseburn valley.

 

Opening of Albion Row Housing Cooperative.

 

St. Lawrence Curch on Walker Rd. is demolished.  The site comprises housing at Fenning Place, near St. Peter’s ‘bottom’ social club.

Date:
1984

Subject:
Place & People

Source:
Evening Chronicle


J.T. Parrish, Shields Rd’s department store closes.

 

Due to changes in central government policy, funding for council housing is stopped.  The last phase of Erskine’s work at the Harbottle area is half completed as the building contractor Marshall’s is declared bankrupt.

Erskine closes the office at Brinkburn St.

The city council tries to sue Erskine’s practice.  The Harbottle phase is demolished.

Date:
1970’s –1980‘s

Subject:
Place, people

Source:


Many sheltered housing schemes in the Byker area are built including Avondale House, Oban Court, Tom Collings House, Byker Lodge, Theresa Russell House, Byker Hall, Allendale House and Belvedere House.

Date:
Late 1980’s

Subject:

Source:


Blue Anchor Court off Queen St, a private development on Newcastle’s quayside is built, closely modelled on Erskine’s work in Byker.

1990's

Events

Date:
1990

Subject:
Place

Source:


The Shields Rd. by-pass is built and Presto supermarket opens with large car parks.

St. Peter’s Marina is built by Barratt Homes on land owned by the Tyne and Wear Development Corporation. The foundation stone is laid by Prime Minister Thatcher.  A year later it is formally opened by Diana, Princess of Wales.

Date:
1990’s -2000’s

Subject:

Source:


The north east reinvents itself as a tourist attraction and creative destination, with major investment to the Newcastle and Gateshead quaysides, the Angel of the North sculpture in Gateshead, BALTIC: centre of contemporary art and Gateshead Millennium Bridge.

Date:
1990’s

Subject:
People, place

Source:


A recession occurs and takes its toll with the rise of crime in Byker and elsewhere.

Anthony Kennedy (known as ‘Rat Boy’), emerges both as a vilified criminal and bizarrely, a folk hero.  Byker becomes associated with crime and the causes and symptoms of crime: theft, vandalism, arson, drug dependency, unemployment and low educational achievement.  It experiences negative perception and population loss.

Date:
1993-5

Subject:

Source:


The BBC broadcast a series of art programmes in Byker as does Channel 4.

The former Ouseburn school is renovated to become Ouseburn Business Development Centre.

Date:
1993-6

Subject:

Source:


A major fire occurs to Maynard’s former toffee factory resulting in the creation of the Ouseburn Trust, a group formed by local people.

Date:
1994

Subject:

Source:


The launch of the National Lottery

Date:
1996

Subject:

Source:


Miller’s Auctioneers relocates form the city centre to Rington’s former factory.

The former Parrish’s store is converted to student accommodation.

Date:
1999

Subject:
People and Place

Source:
Newcastle City Council


Demolition of Erskine houses and flats at Cushat Close and Whickham Gardens. Demolition of Bolam Coyne is proposed but fails due to a resident-led international campaign.  The planned demolition becomes the catalyst that begins the process which results in listing status some 8 years later.

2000's

Events

Date:
2001

Subject:
Place

Source:
NCC


The East End Pool and Library opens.

Date:
Early to mid 2000’s

Subject:
Place

Source:


In association with The eat End End Partnership and a property developer, Morrison’s supermarket, Gala Bingo and Kentucky Fried Chicken open at the bottom of Shields Rd involving demolition to large areas.  St. Silas Church is partially converted into offices for Byker Bridge Housing Association, who build a number of housing supported schemes in the area.  McDonald’s opens at the top of Shields Rd.

Safeway, Netto and Kwiksave supermarkets close as do a number of small shops.

Major landscape changes are made to the former branch railway, resulting in ‘Byker Link’.  This comprises pedestrian and cycle access ways, a metal archway and fencing scheme, the partial demolition of Victorian era stone walls and the installation of surveillance cameras.

Date:
2003- 4

Subject:
Place

Source:


80+ cameras are installed in the Byker redevelopment partly paid for by tenants.

 

Byker Presbyterian church (Kingsland church) is sold to a photographic practice.  Electrically operated gates and cameras are installed.

 

Dunston Staithes housing development is built by Wimpey Homes.  It follows many of Erskine’s design elements.

 

The Byker Design Competition is launched for the areas of St. Lawrence Sq. and the south side of Commercial Rd.  As a major ‘regeneration’ scheme it involves extensive ‘community consultation’ and results in the demolition of Victorian era homes at St. Lawrence Sq. for preparation for the sale of council land to property developers.  The scheme stalls due to the recession a few years later.  It cost £1.5 million.

 

Ouseburn Farm opens on the former site of Byker City Farm, managed and leased by Byker Bridge Housing Association (now Tyne Bridge).

Date:
2004-5

Subject:
Place

Source:


Your Homes Newcastle, an arms-length management organisation is created by the city council to manage council housing stock.

Date:
2005

Subject:
Place

Source:


Ralph Erskine dies in Sweden.  Obituaries are written in world wide newspapers, magazines and periodicals.

Date:
2005

Subject:

Source:
North East Civic Trust, English Heritage and NCC.


A two volume ‘Conservation Plan for the Byker Estate’’ is published.

Date:
2005-11

Subject:
Place

Source:


The land surrounding Bolam Coyne is co-managed by a group of local residents who hold a number of gardening and wildlife events.

The netting of walkways and balconies to deter pigeons occurs to Dunn and Northumberland Terrace homes followed later at Shipley Walk and Dalton Crescent.

Major changes to street lighting occur in the Byker redevelopment involving the removal of trees.

Date:
2007

Subject:
Place

Source:
English Heritage


Most of Erskine’s Byker is ‘listed’ with Grade 2* status.

Date:
2009

Subject:
Place

Source:
Newcastle City Council


The East End Customer Service Centre opens on Shields Rd.

2010's

Events

Date:
2010-11

Subject:
Place

Source:
NCC


An application to central government for a Private Finance Initiative solution for investment is made by the city council. Residents are not consulted.  The bid is unsuccessful.

Newcastle Shopping Park is built on former engineering sites. It comprises a number of national retail chain shops.  ASDA opens a food supermarket, altering initial planning permission restrictions.

The former Presto/Safeway site is bought by Winns Solicitors for offices and a car park, secured by electrically operated gates.

Date:
2011-12

Subject:
Place, people

Source:
NCC, YHN, Byker tenants and residents


Newcastle council proposes transferring council stock to be owned by ‘The Byker Community Trust’.  This is achieved by a well orchestrated campaign to ensure a positive vote.

After extensive remodelling, Bolam Coyne is renovated and re-inhabited by tenants.

The Hare and Hounds pub on Raby St. is demolished.

Date:
2012

Subject:
Place

Source:


The expansion of the east end police station to include Clifford St car park, involving a road closure and the installation of fencing and electrically operated gates.

Additional CCTV cameras are installed in the Byker redevelopment.

Date:
2013

Subject:
Place

Source:


The East End Customer Service Centre is proposed for closure to be incorporated into the East End Library